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  • Chloe Bachman

Rochester University participates in JDRF walk

Updated: Feb 25

Chloe Bachman

Staff writer


Rochester University students, staff, friends and families gathered at the Detroit Riverwalk on Sept. 22 to walk a mile to help end type 1 diabetes. Rochester University raised $2,263, well over the group's goal of $1,000.


Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which a person’s pancreas produces little to no insulin. What this means is that the person has to constantly be aware of his or her blood sugar levels and take insulin before eating in order to make sure blood sugar levels stay in range.


Type 1 diabetes affects many students at Rochester University, which was one of the reasons this event was planned. The support from so many students meant much to RU students with type 1 diabetes. Katie Romano, a junior Christian ministry major and a type 1 diabetic, said, “Having type 1 diabetes is a constant battle and being able to see all of the people who support me in this everyday was truly amazing. Having a group come together to raise money and awareness to help find a cure for this disease was empowering.”


In addition to the walk, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation event featured music, games, free snacks, free merchandise and pictures. The event was family-orientated and focused on celebrating the strength of those living with type 1 diabetes.


The walk was also meaningful to family members of those who have the condition. Viola Warden, a walk attendee, said, “What walking in this event means to me is being able to support my friends at Rochester University and some of my family members as they go through their life with type 1 diabetes.”


Type 1 diabetes can often be misunderstood for what it really is and what it does to the human body. Madison Sparks, a junior management major who is also type 1 diabetic, said, “Diabetes has affected me both personally as well as physically. I have had to rethink what foods I eat and when I eat them. I have to constantly be aware of my blood sugar levels and whether it is high or low or normal. It can be exhausting at times but with the help of those around me I can make it work.”


Type 1 diabetes is a manageable disease and the JDRF continues to bring awareness to the disease. For more information about JDRF, go to jdrf.org.



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